Sunday, January 24, 2010

Band, Single and Double Flange Hoops Explained

Too often the terms "single flange" and "stickchopper" are erroneously used when describing vintage style hoops. Hopefully I can set the record straight.

Early snare drums used "band" type hoops; in fact as late as the 1950s that style was used on student model snare drums. This hoop has no bends or lip - just a straight band as shown in the following photo. Note the top and bottom edges are flat.

Single flange hoops have a lip (flange) on the bottom edge as shown in the next photo. This allowed the hoop to better seat on the flesh hoop on the drum head:

Double flange hoops - commonly referred to as "stickchoppers" had an additional bend or flange that allowed for tabs or ears to be included on the hoop for tension rods, eliminating the clips. The following photo illustrates this:

Modern hoops, typically triple flanged, have an additional flange or bend at the top to prevent the "stick chopper" effect. Most flange outward, although Slingerland's hoops flanged inward. At any rate, aside from specialty products, such as the Worldmax single flange hoops (and hoops offered by Pearl on some of their model snare drums) modern metal hoops are typically triple flanged and made of either stamped metal or are die cast.

I hope this clears up the confusing nomenclature.

2 comments:

Hasheem said...

I'm an experienced Drummer & percussionist who over the yrs. have been looking to better understand the musical(drum) jargon thrown around & how these different specs add or take away from the type of sound a drummer desires. By Far this article or... that I read was straight forward and definitely furthered my understanding of snares and the there many components.

Hasheem said...

I'm an experienced Drummer & percussionist who over the yrs. have been looking to better understand the musical(drum) jargon thrown around & how these different specs add or take away from the type of sound a drummer desires. By Far this article or... that I read was straight forward and definitely furthered my understanding of snares and the there many components.